Scots & German: Observations

Hello everyone, thought I’d write a short, quick blog on something that has sparked some interesting thoughts recently! I find there to be LOADS of similarities between Shetland dialect/Scots and German and thought it really interesting.  I’d love to do a more in depth study one day as to why this is, the origins of the languages and to find all the examples. I’m definitely no etymologist but I don’t think it can be a coincidence!

Here’s a couple of examples I can think of just now:

English: to cough 

Scots/Shetland dialect: to host 

German: husten 

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English: the sky

Scots/Shetland dialect: da Lift

German: die Luft 

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English: cow

Scots/Shetland dialect: coo

German: die Kuh (pronounced the same as the Scots – coo) 

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English: came (past participle)

Scots/Shetland dialect: cam 

German: kam

There are loads more examples, those are just three from the top of my head.  I notice things like Germans saying ‘Ihre Mann ist Herr Müller.’ (her husband is Mr. Müller) and I know that in Shetland ‘man’ is used when referring to someone’s husband all the time: ‘Her man is Mr. Müller.’  Another example would be that Shetlanders sometimes retain genders when talking about objects in the same way that the Germans to (albeit in a much lesser manner): I’ve dropped my pen! Could du pick him up?’ And of course the use of the word ‘du’ (unsure of spelling here) and accusative ‘dee’ for the English ‘you’.  ‘Du’ is the exact same word that the Germans use and they also have the accusative ‘dich’ which is pronounced almost the exact same to ‘dee’ just with a little throaty sound on the end. Of course in Shetland the definitive ariticle is ‘da’ and this is very similar to the German neuter definite article ‘das’.

These are just small observations and again, I would love to one day be able to do some more study on this theme.  I almost wish I was writing a dissertation! People who are in the middle of writing theirs next year will probably kill me for writing that. (It’s not compulsory as part of my joint honours Law and German LLB as I don’t have enough time.)

I can’t be sure what is Scots and what is only specific to Shetland dialect.. I’m most definitely not an expert on the subject and my only source is my experience. Maybe it isn’t similar to Scots at all and the similar words in Shetland dialect relate to more Scandinavian routes? For one, I don’t actually know the accurate definiton of ‘Scots’ and when I refer to this I really just mean words that I have heard Scottish people say that the English don’t say.

A quick google search of “Scots and German” hasn’t really turned anything up.  I’m sure there are academic journals/articles on the subject and I definitely would like to learn some more. If anyone sees any mistakes or misunderstandings in any of this please let me know! I accept I am totally ignorant on the subject and I am just speaking from what I have heard! And PLEASE let me know if you have any other examples!

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5 thoughts on “Scots & German: Observations

  1. Thanks Jennifer, very interesting indeed!

    On Sat, Apr 18, 2015 at 2:45 PM, Jennifer in Germany wrote:

    > jennifersimblog posted: “Hello everyone, thought I’d write a short, > quick blog on something that has sparked some interesting thoughts > recently! I find there to be LOADS of similarities between Shetland > dialect/Scots and German and thought it really interesting. I’d love to do > a”

    Like

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